erikkwakkel
erikkwakkel:

Blue world
This amazing image is part of a series of maps in a manuscript from the 1460s. What is striking is not just that we can so clearly recognize Europe, Asia and Africa, but that these continents are depicted so incredibly beautifully, in deep blue and gold. The map seems to float in space and above it various winds are blowing, produced by men with toy trumpets. Clouds are quietly drifting by. Who can resist jumping in and becoming part of this intoxicating blue world?
Pic: New York, Public Library, MS 87 (15th century). More blue maps from this book here.

erikkwakkel:

Blue world

This amazing image is part of a series of maps in a manuscript from the 1460s. What is striking is not just that we can so clearly recognize Europe, Asia and Africa, but that these continents are depicted so incredibly beautifully, in deep blue and gold. The map seems to float in space and above it various winds are blowing, produced by men with toy trumpets. Clouds are quietly drifting by. Who can resist jumping in and becoming part of this intoxicating blue world?

Pic: New York, Public Library, MS 87 (15th century). More blue maps from this book here.

MFK (Mary Frances Kennedy) Fisher (1908-1992) was a famous American food author.  Her writing style is a delightful amalgamation of memoir, travel, and food literature.  Her personal experiences and travels to Europe helped create her identity as an approachable and relatable chef.  Her recipes do not emulate fine restaurants, but are simple and elegant.  Her book How to Cook a Wolf was one of her most successful.  First published in 1942 during the World War II food shortage, Fisher wrote about how to make food economically and how to enjoy it.  In his 1942 review of the book, Orville Prescott of the New York Times wrote:

“Cook books are indisputably indispensable for the welfare of the human race, and they sell very nicely (Fannie Farmer’s ”Boston Cook Book” some 2,040,000 copies). […] Few indeed have any claims to literary merit. At least, few did until a knowing lady who signs herself austerely M. F. K. Fisher began conducting her one-woman revolution in the field of literary cookery. Mrs. Fisher writes about food with such relish and enthusiasm that the mere reading of her books creates a clamorous appetite. She also writes with a robust sense of humor and a nice capacity for a neatly turned phrase. […] Her chapter titles themselves are gems that provoke an irresistible desire to find out just what on earth she means by them: ”How to Distribute Your Virtue,” ”How to Boil Water,” ”How to Greet the Spring,” ”How to Be Cheerful Through Starving” ”How to Pray for Peace,” ”How to Be Content With a Vegetable Love” and ”How to Have a Sleek Pelt.” “ (“Books of the Times”)

-Jillian P.

Szathmary Collection TX715 .F542 1942

thebrainscoop

thebrainscoop:

The Brain Scoop:
The Audubon Field Guide

It’s John James Audubon’s birthday on April 26th, so we decided to celebrate his life and illustrative legacy by focusing on The Field Museum’s Library/Archives, which house a complete set of his infamous work: The Birds of America. Every Tuesday our librarians change a single page in one of the four massive volumes to reveal a new print - out of 435 different images, it will take more than 8 years to repeat a single image. 

Audubon was an interesting and often times amusing character from history but there is a certain relatability to his life: he started on this artist pilgrimage when he was 35, he failed publicly and often, was unconventional in his artistry, and at times was quite unpopular - but in the end he left an impact on his world which we still see today, 163 years after his death. 

Happy Birthday, J. J. Your gorgeous flowing locks will never be forgotten. 

The Brain Scoop + The Field Museum’s Copy of Audubon’s Birds of America!

uimapcoll
uimapcoll:

Happy Belated Earth Day!
This little tribute to Earth Day comes in the form of a Flat Earth map created by Gilbert Johnson in 1890. My favorite feature of this map is the oddly eloquent text running along the outside ring: “Line where the Earth and sky join”
Map: Johnson, Gilbert. Map of the earth / Gilbert Johnson, author and publisher.  Grandin, Carter Co., Mo. : [Gilbert Johnson], c1890.

uimapcoll:

Happy Belated Earth Day!

This little tribute to Earth Day comes in the form of a Flat Earth map created by Gilbert Johnson in 1890. My favorite feature of this map is the oddly eloquent text running along the outside ring: “Line where the Earth and sky join”

Map: Johnson, Gilbert. Map of the earth / Gilbert Johnson, author and publisher.  Grandin, Carter Co., Mo. : [Gilbert Johnson], c1890.

uispeccoll

uispeccoll:

Miniature Monday!  Large and small!  This 1904 set of William Shakespeare’s Complete Works, comes with its own miniature sized shelves, and is hanging out with it much older and larger relative (and our most frequently requested book for class sessions here at Iowa), our copy of Shakespeare’s second folio.

David Bryce and Son, Glasgow, 1904. 

Just bringing back one of our favorite Shakespeare posts to celebrate Shakespeare’s birthday week.    

erikkwakkel
erikkwakkel:

Titanic-shaped medieval fragment
You are looking at a fragment of a handwritten medieval page cut into an odd shape so it could be pasted, as support, inside a book binding. Remarkably, our modern eyes recognize its shape as that of the Titanic, the unsinkable ship that was taken by the sea in 1912. The giant boat and the medieval book are not so different, if you think of it. Both were masterpieces of human ingenuity that incorporated numerous innovations. The ship went down in spite of it; so, too, did the handwritten book. The very fact that the above page was cut from a medieval manuscript shows that the object’s time had come. After the invention of the printing press bookbinders started to recycle “old-fashioned” handwritten books, using their pages as support for bindings. This fragment is like debris washed up on the shore: it’s what remains of the unsinkable handwritten book that went down under pressure of the printing press.
Pic: Lawrence, University of Kansas, Kenneth Spencer Research Library, MS 9/2:31 (France, c. 1100, incorrectly dated 890-910 in the library’s catalogue description - also source image). I spotted the fragment in this blog. Read this blog if you want to know more about cutting up medieval books.

erikkwakkel:

Titanic-shaped medieval fragment

You are looking at a fragment of a handwritten medieval page cut into an odd shape so it could be pasted, as support, inside a book binding. Remarkably, our modern eyes recognize its shape as that of the Titanic, the unsinkable ship that was taken by the sea in 1912. The giant boat and the medieval book are not so different, if you think of it. Both were masterpieces of human ingenuity that incorporated numerous innovations. The ship went down in spite of it; so, too, did the handwritten book. The very fact that the above page was cut from a medieval manuscript shows that the object’s time had come. After the invention of the printing press bookbinders started to recycle “old-fashioned” handwritten books, using their pages as support for bindings. This fragment is like debris washed up on the shore: it’s what remains of the unsinkable handwritten book that went down under pressure of the printing press.

Pic: Lawrence, University of Kansas, Kenneth Spencer Research Library, MS 9/2:31 (France, c. 1100, incorrectly dated 890-910 in the library’s catalogue description - also source image). I spotted the fragment in this blog. Read this blog if you want to know more about cutting up medieval books.