By request for @suzannareads.  I found these two editions of books by Elizabeth von Arnim.  Ranney Collection 828 .R965e 1900 

These two books were donated by Mrs. Martha Ranney who collected “limited editions in fine bindings and art books, books which the University could not purchase out of its regular appropriation,” and donated them in memory of her husband Mark Ranney in 1907. His donated book collection had burned in the library fire in 1897.  

Thanks for requesting by the way.  I love that Mrs. Ranney put the clippings in the back of the book that announce the identity of the author.

iowawomensarchives

iowawomensarchives:

  1. Spoiler alert.
  2. Happy Easter!! In a secular, candy-based way. Or not. Whatever you’re into…

Love, Iowa Women’s Archives

Iowa Digital Library: Patsy Carroll girls’ series advertisement in Ruth Fielding and Her Greatest Triumph by Alice B. Emerson (aka Mildred Wirt Benson), 1933

Iowa Women’s Archives: Guide to the Mildred Wirt Benson papers, 1915-2002

View all Women’s History Wednesday posts

Today it’s all about the Yapp!  Here is a three volume set of Livy’s History of Rome printed in Amsterdam by Ludovicum & Danielem Elzevirios in 1664 and edited by the German scholar Johann Fredrich Gronovius.  This set is bound in vellum with lovely yapps at the foreedge.  Yapps were widely used in early modern binding.  (To see another yapp in action check out this Staxpeditions video!)

I just learned how to make a yapp at the uicb!  Here is a model I made out of department office supplies!

Cheers!

-Jillian P.

PA6452 .A2 1664

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bibliophileforrent

erikkwakkel:
Sharing a binding
This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.
Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

erikkwakkel:

Sharing a binding

This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.

Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).