ritabentonmusiclibrary

ritabentonmusiclibrary:

Playing the harpsicord, spinnet or piano forte, made easy by new instructions wherein the Italian manner of fingering is shewn by variety of examples, with choice lessons selected from the most eminent masters, proper for beginners, and very useful for proficients on those instruments or the organ, with concise rules for playing a good thoro’ bass. Also an approv’d method of tuning, & a dictionary explaining such words as generally occur in music.
London, Longman and Broderip [1780?]
42 p. illus. 17 x 25 cm.
Second, augmented edition?

Today’s post takes a closer look at this list of musical terms on page 36 of this 46 page handbook on the harpsichord.

It’s tricky to define the scale of musical tempo and dynamic markings concisely and effectively. This may be why the author defines allegro in a rolling paragraph, where the tempo is described as “brisk”, but can be modified to be “not as quick” or “quicker” with additional terms.

Happy coincidence places grave and largo in alphabetical proximity, so the author can move from grave as “very slow” through larghetto as just “slow” to the happy medium of largo as “slower than larghetto but not as slow as grave.”

Finally, there’s the various piu designations, making different terms “a little more” than what they were solo (a little louder, quicker, etc.). However, I think what the author needed “a little more” of at this point was column inches.

This volume also contains some great charts for playing thorough bass and instructions for how to properly tune one’s harpsichord, and I’ll post those in the weeks to come.

Although the technology has changed, the message still remains the same: Use the (electronic) card catalog!  

This guide for children was written by Carolyn Mott and Leo B. Baisden in 1937.  Mott was a teacher-librarian and Baisden was the assistant superintendent of schools in Sacramento, California.  

These two authors compiled a guide for children using the library which ranged in topics from “How to Open a New Book” to “How to make a Bibliography.”

This book includes a lot of useful information, quizzes at the end of each chapter, as well as plenty of kid-friendly illustrations.  

And I promise we won’t look as exasperated as the librarian depicted here, no matter how many times we direct you to the electronic card catalog.  Happy to answer any questions!

-Kelly

Mott, Carolyn.  The children’s book on how to use books and libraries / Carolyn Mott and Leo B. Baisden.  Chicago : C. Scribner’s Sons, 1937.

Miniature Monday!

Little Key of Heaven: a selection of prayers and devotional exercises [,] with the approval of the most Rev. Archbishop of Milwaukee. Milwaukee: Hoffman Brothers Company, Printers to the Holy Apostolic See: 1893

This book is interesting for several reasons.  First of all, the binding is made of a hard, shiny material, which could possibly be some type of bone or enamel, which served both protective and aesthetic purposes.  There is an inscription on the recto of the front end sheet which reads: “Remembrance of first holy communion at St. Mary’s Church [,] Carlyle, Ills. April 17.1898”  Furthermore, someone went to town with a crayon or pencil on both the front and back end sheets, possibly the recipient of the book.  The book contains the dates of church festivals, the mass in both Latin and English, the mass for the dead, information on saints as well as daily prayers.  Working with rare books, I often encounter books of hours and other personal devotion books from the middle ages.  These books are important personal artifacts from a time hundreds of years in the past; information in them can give clues about who owned the book, where they lived, and what life was like in that place and time.  Seeing this one from the end of the 19th century reminded me that the tradition of personal devotional texts has carried on, and is not only relegated to the middle ages.  Just another way that studying books helps link us to the past, and clarifies our moment in the present :)

Little Key of Heaven: a selection of prayers and devotional exercises [,] with the approval of the most Rev. Archbishop of Milwaukee. Milwaukee: Hoffman Brothers Company, Printers to the Holy Apostolic See: 1893.  Charlotte Smith Miniatures Collection, Uncatalogued

See all of our Miniature Monday posts here

See more of our miniature devotional texts here, here, and here for just a taste of what we have!

-Laura H. 

iowawomensarchives
iowawomensarchives:

Farm girls, Newhall, Iowa, 1920s

Our farm was a mile from the school. This was my first experience of walking to school. When the weather was bad, Dad would harness the horse and take us in a buggy. In the [1910s], we didn’t have slacks — we wore long underwear, black tights, long black stockings, and four-buckle overshoes. The older children would carry drinking water from the Armstrong farm, a short distance away…
We learned to play jacks. Having cement sidewalk was almost a requirement for the game. We would play by the hour. I can recall playing until my fingernails were gone, due to scraping the cement to gather the jacks. [Cousin] Luella often joined us…
Luella and I enjoyed the [farm] cats and kittens, dressing them in doll clothes. The cats didn’t seem to mind, for they would go to sleep. — Melba Gardemann Olson unpublished memoir, 1993

Iowa Digital Library: Rural Women Digital Collection
View all Women’s History Wednesday posts

iowawomensarchives:

Farm girls, Newhall, Iowa, 1920s

Our farm was a mile from the school. This was my first experience of walking to school. When the weather was bad, Dad would harness the horse and take us in a buggy. In the [1910s], we didn’t have slacks — we wore long underwear, black tights, long black stockings, and four-buckle overshoes. The older children would carry drinking water from the Armstrong farm, a short distance away…

We learned to play jacks. Having cement sidewalk was almost a requirement for the game. We would play by the hour. I can recall playing until my fingernails were gone, due to scraping the cement to gather the jacks. [Cousin] Luella often joined us…

Luella and I enjoyed the [farm] cats and kittens, dressing them in doll clothes. The cats didn’t seem to mind, for they would go to sleep. — Melba Gardemann Olson unpublished memoir, 1993

Iowa Digital Library: Rural Women Digital Collection

View all Women’s History Wednesday posts

Robert May (1588?-1664) was one of very few cooks in England who received extensive training in English and French training (and even some Spanish and Italian). May was the son of Edward May the cook for the Dormers of Ascott Park, a wealthy Catholic family.  “W.W.,” May’s biographer, believed that it was the Dormers’ and his father’s influence that led to May studying cookery in France for five years. After his training, May worked with his father and cooked for the Dormers. He was chef to a numer of other Catholic families within the Dormers’ social circle as well.

May’s biography prefaces his book, The accomplisht cook, or, The art & mystery of cookery. May included incredibly detailed descriptions on how to prepare flesh, fowl, fish, or any other manner of à-la-mode curiosities.  The book includes small woodcuts throughout, but the most exciting features are the fold out diagrams for making all manner of pies.  Two whole chapters are dedicated to the many ways to make pies! If you are making a fish pie the crust better show the shape of the fish you are preparing!

-Jillian (who now wishes she had found this book before making her first pie last weekend)

TX705 .M46 1685