Here we have a modern take on an old classic.  This is a limited edition of The Divine Comedy, originally written by Dante Alighieri in the early 14th century.  This rendition, translated by Robert and Jean Hollander stays true to the story Dante had to tell and includes some very vivid images provided by Monika Beisner.  Beisner created 100 detailed paintings for this work and is credited with being the first woman to ever illustrate the entirety of The Divine Comedy.

Alighieri, Dante. The Divine Comedy. Translated by Robert & Jean Hollander ; Illustrated by Monika Beisner ; [introduction by Carlo Carena ; foreword by Roberto Benigni].  Verona : Edizioni Valdonega, 2007.

Special Collections x-Collection FOLIO PQ4315 .H6 2007 

uispeccoll

uispeccoll:

itscolossal:

Secret Fore-Edge Paintings Revealed in Early 19th Century Books at the University of Iowa

Oh! Here is the version from Colossal. Almost the same!

One year later:

One year ago today our fore-edge painting post and GIFs were posted to the Colossal Art and Design Blog. Our fore-edge painting post is still being forwarded around the world everyday and it is currently #12 most shared posts of all time on the Colossal.

Happy Miniature Monday!

Today we will take a walk through 1840’s Philadelphia with City Sights for Little Folks.  This book features illustrations of things you could expect to see on your journey through town, accompanied with brief descriptions and occasional rhymes.  For those of you interested in the history of print, this book was printed via stereotype, a  method of printing  developed in the 18th century to keep up with the rapidly rising demand for books.  With traditional handset type, printers ran into issues when numerous copies of the same text were needed in quick succession.  With movable, hand-set type the compositor had to arrange each word letter-by-letter on the press bed; when dealing with multiple machines running the same text, this method leaves room for lots of errors, and also requires huge volumes of standing type.  A stereotype is a metal cast of multiple forms of type, which can then be used on a press instead of a hand-assembled form.  That way, printers could use several stereotypes to print the same text quickly, without a huge need for more inventory or staff. Thus, this book is an interesting window into history.  It provides a child’s-eye view of Philadelphia in the mid-19th century, and also embodies a printing technology that was very popular and significant at the time. 

City Sights for Little Folks.  Philadelphia: Smith & Peck, 1845.  Charlotte Smith Miniature Collection, Uncatalogued.

See all of our Miniature Monday’s posts 

See all of our posts with GIFS

-Laura H.

bookporn

erikkwakkel:

Medieval rockstar

The last page of a medieval book is usually a protective flyleaf, which is positioned between the actual text and the bookbinding. It was usually left blank and it therefore often filled up with pen trials, notes, doodles, or drawings. This addition I encountered today and it is not what you’d expect: a full-on drawing of a maiden playing the lute, which she holds just like a guitar. A peaceful smile shines on her face. I love this rockstar lady, so unexpectedly positioned at the end of the book, trying to catch the reader’s attention as he is closing it.

Pic: London, British Library, Sloane MS 554 (more here).

tweitzelposts
tweitzelposts:

iowacitypast:

Scottish Highlanders with dancer Honore Hughes, The University of Iowa, 1970
Photographer: Frederick W. Kent
Source: Frederick W. Kent Collection of Photographs
RG 30.01.01, University of Iowa Archives
Online in the Iowa Digital Library: http://digital.lib.uiowa.edu/cdm/ref/collection/ictcs/id/11825


The Scottish Highlanders began as an all male musicians group in 1936. They were founded by Colonel George F. N. Dailey as an extension of ROTC training. In the 1943 the group became all female and included musicians and dancers, though later an all male pipers group sometimes would participate with the female highlanders group. The SUI Scottish Highlanders  performed at home football games and one Big Ten away game. They also performed two of the UI appearances in the Rose Bowl in 1957 and 1959. Due to their growing popularity, they appeared in several prominent performances, including  The Tonight Show, The Ed Sullivan Show, Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, the New York World’s Fair, Chicago’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade, Disneyland and Disney World and helped with the war bond effort during the Second World War. They went on seven world tours in 1952 to 1976 in the UK and Europe. UI funding was canceled in 1972, just two years after this photo was taken. The group continued until 2008 when they were disbanded.

tweitzelposts:

iowacitypast:

Scottish Highlanders with dancer Honore Hughes, The University of Iowa, 1970

Photographer: Frederick W. Kent

Source: Frederick W. Kent Collection of Photographs

RG 30.01.01, University of Iowa Archives

Online in the Iowa Digital Library: http://digital.lib.uiowa.edu/cdm/ref/collection/ictcs/id/11825

The Scottish Highlanders began as an all male musicians group in 1936. They were founded by Colonel George F. N. Dailey as an extension of ROTC training. In the 1943 the group became all female and included musicians and dancers, though later an all male pipers group sometimes would participate with the female highlanders group. The SUI Scottish Highlanders  performed at home football games and one Big Ten away game. They also performed two of the UI appearances in the Rose Bowl in 1957 and 1959. Due to their growing popularity, they appeared in several prominent performances, including  The Tonight Show, The Ed Sullivan Show, Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, the New York World’s Fair, Chicago’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade, Disneyland and Disney World and helped with the war bond effort during the Second World War. They went on seven world tours in 1952 to 1976 in the UK and Europe. UI funding was canceled in 1972, just two years after this photo was taken. The group continued until 2008 when they were disbanded.

Here we have a lovely pocket edition of The Compleat Angler printed in 1825 in London by William Pickering.  Both an author and biographer, Izaak Walton’s (1593-1683) first edition of of The Compleat Angler was printed in 1653.  He produced a second edition almost immediately after in 1655.  In this second edition we see the format that subsequent editions have kept.  Walton wrote the book as a dialogue between travelers who practiced different forms of recreation: Piscator (fisherman), Venator (hunter), and Auceps (falconer).  Piscator teaches his companions the art of fishing and how its practice leads to a more meaningful life.  Walton continued to revise and reissue his work throughout his lifetime.  His friend Charles Cotton (1630-1687) worked on the piece as well, producing part two and finishing the text we are familiar with today.  

To get a sense of how small this book is I’ve included a few dry flies: a wooly bugger (fuzzy green one), a purple haze, and a CDC(cul de canard) Elk Hair caddis (small tan and orange one).

Jillian

799.12 W239 c1825

uispeccoll

uispeccoll:

It’s a secret to everybody…

This is one example of a fore-edge painting from a four volume set of scientific books which are divided by season.  Each has a landscape painting of the season hidden until you begin to read it and bend the pages to turn them.

Autumn; or; The causes, appearances, and effects of the seasonal decay and decomposition of nature, 1837. By Robert Mudie.

This little post, a year ago yesterday, started quite a whirlwind for us as it was picked up by Colossal and is still being posted all over the world.

[Wish you were here] / by Emily Martin.  [Iowa City, Iowa : Naughty Dog Press, 1996]

"Consists of 21 envelopes and 57 postcards commemorating the artist’s trip to Wales and mailed to Iowa City, Iowa. The postcards, numbered sequentially from 1 to 57, are distributed in groups of 3 in the envelopes, each set forming one continuous communication. Each envelope also contains some memento from the trip, e.g., an airline boarding pass, a hotel receipt, a parking ticket, etc. Postmarked chiefly from Cardiff, Wales, the envelopes are joined to each other by interlocking loops cut from their ends and hinged together by a series of red and yellow pencils".

N7433.4.M364 W5 1996 

Emily Martin teaches in the University of Iowa Center for the Book. ( uicb ).