bookporn

erikkwakkel:

Medieval rockstar

The last page of a medieval book is usually a protective flyleaf, which is positioned between the actual text and the bookbinding. It was usually left blank and it therefore often filled up with pen trials, notes, doodles, or drawings. This addition I encountered today and it is not what you’d expect: a full-on drawing of a maiden playing the lute, which she holds just like a guitar. A peaceful smile shines on her face. I love this rockstar lady, so unexpectedly positioned at the end of the book, trying to catch the reader’s attention as he is closing it.

Pic: London, British Library, Sloane MS 554 (more here).

tweitzelposts
tweitzelposts:

iowacitypast:

Scottish Highlanders with dancer Honore Hughes, The University of Iowa, 1970
Photographer: Frederick W. Kent
Source: Frederick W. Kent Collection of Photographs
RG 30.01.01, University of Iowa Archives
Online in the Iowa Digital Library: http://digital.lib.uiowa.edu/cdm/ref/collection/ictcs/id/11825


The Scottish Highlanders began as an all male musicians group in 1936. They were founded by Colonel George F. N. Dailey as an extension of ROTC training. In the 1943 the group became all female and included musicians and dancers, though later an all male pipers group sometimes would participate with the female highlanders group. The SUI Scottish Highlanders  performed at home football games and one Big Ten away game. They also performed two of the UI appearances in the Rose Bowl in 1957 and 1959. Due to their growing popularity, they appeared in several prominent performances, including  The Tonight Show, The Ed Sullivan Show, Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, the New York World’s Fair, Chicago’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade, Disneyland and Disney World and helped with the war bond effort during the Second World War. They went on seven world tours in 1952 to 1976 in the UK and Europe. UI funding was canceled in 1972, just two years after this photo was taken. The group continued until 2008 when they were disbanded.

tweitzelposts:

iowacitypast:

Scottish Highlanders with dancer Honore Hughes, The University of Iowa, 1970

Photographer: Frederick W. Kent

Source: Frederick W. Kent Collection of Photographs

RG 30.01.01, University of Iowa Archives

Online in the Iowa Digital Library: http://digital.lib.uiowa.edu/cdm/ref/collection/ictcs/id/11825

The Scottish Highlanders began as an all male musicians group in 1936. They were founded by Colonel George F. N. Dailey as an extension of ROTC training. In the 1943 the group became all female and included musicians and dancers, though later an all male pipers group sometimes would participate with the female highlanders group. The SUI Scottish Highlanders  performed at home football games and one Big Ten away game. They also performed two of the UI appearances in the Rose Bowl in 1957 and 1959. Due to their growing popularity, they appeared in several prominent performances, including  The Tonight Show, The Ed Sullivan Show, Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, the New York World’s Fair, Chicago’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade, Disneyland and Disney World and helped with the war bond effort during the Second World War. They went on seven world tours in 1952 to 1976 in the UK and Europe. UI funding was canceled in 1972, just two years after this photo was taken. The group continued until 2008 when they were disbanded.

Here we have a lovely pocket edition of The Compleat Angler printed in 1825 in London by William Pickering.  Both an author and biographer, Izaak Walton’s (1593-1683) first edition of of The Compleat Angler was printed in 1653.  He produced a second edition almost immediately after in 1655.  In this second edition we see the format that subsequent editions have kept.  Walton wrote the book as a dialogue between travelers who practiced different forms of recreation: Piscator (fisherman), Venator (hunter), and Auceps (falconer).  Piscator teaches his companions the art of fishing and how its practice leads to a more meaningful life.  Walton continued to revise and reissue his work throughout his lifetime.  His friend Charles Cotton (1630-1687) worked on the piece as well, producing part two and finishing the text we are familiar with today.  

To get a sense of how small this book is I’ve included a few dry flies: a wooly bugger (fuzzy green one), a purple haze, and a CDC(cul de canard) Elk Hair caddis (small tan and orange one).

Jillian

799.12 W239 c1825

uispeccoll

uispeccoll:

It’s a secret to everybody…

This is one example of a fore-edge painting from a four volume set of scientific books which are divided by season.  Each has a landscape painting of the season hidden until you begin to read it and bend the pages to turn them.

Autumn; or; The causes, appearances, and effects of the seasonal decay and decomposition of nature, 1837. By Robert Mudie.

This little post, a year ago yesterday, started quite a whirlwind for us as it was picked up by Colossal and is still being posted all over the world.

[Wish you were here] / by Emily Martin.  [Iowa City, Iowa : Naughty Dog Press, 1996]

"Consists of 21 envelopes and 57 postcards commemorating the artist’s trip to Wales and mailed to Iowa City, Iowa. The postcards, numbered sequentially from 1 to 57, are distributed in groups of 3 in the envelopes, each set forming one continuous communication. Each envelope also contains some memento from the trip, e.g., an airline boarding pass, a hotel receipt, a parking ticket, etc. Postmarked chiefly from Cardiff, Wales, the envelopes are joined to each other by interlocking loops cut from their ends and hinged together by a series of red and yellow pencils".

N7433.4.M364 W5 1996 

Emily Martin teaches in the University of Iowa Center for the Book. ( uicb ).

muspeccoll

houghtonlib:

A 1581 almanac accompanied by ten leaves of paper which have been made erasable by coating with a thick layer of gesso and shellac. An owner would write on the treated paper with a stylus and then wipe the surface clean with a little moisture.

Writing tables with a kalender for xxiiii yeres with other necessary rules, the contents therof you shall find in the other side of this leafe,1581.

STC 26049.8 

Houghton Library, Harvard University

Not all of the items in Special Collections are particularly old, but they are all pretty amazing.

Pictured above is a collector’s edition of Cat’s Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut.  This book was personally signed by the author and also contains an inscription addressed to Loree Rackstraw, a long-time friend of Kurt Vonnegut’s with whom he also had a brief romantic relationship.  These two friends met when Vonnegut first began teaching at the Iowa Writer’s Workshop and they remained close until Vonnegut’s death in 2007. 

If you are interested in learning more about the relationship between Loree Rackstraw and Kurt Vonnegut, feel free to check out Love as Always, Kurt, a memoir published by Rackstraw in 2009. 

-Kelly

Vonnegut, Kurt. Cat’s cradle  Norwalk, Conn. : Easton Press, c2000.

Special Collections x-Collection PS3572.O66 C3 2000 

uispeccoll

uispeccoll:

This is the inside of the lovely binding featured recently.

This book is from Thomas á Kempis and is called De Imitatione Christi from 1489. It is written in Latin. BV4820 .A1 1489

Printed just a generation after Johannes Gutenberg’s Bible, the books in the first 50 years of printing with moveable type in the West are called incunabula (from the “cradle” or origin of printing). The category name exists because they more closely resemble handwritten manuscripts than modern printed books. Printers step by step began inventing the features that developed into what we recognize as a modern book, and the year 1500 is considered the (arbitrary) cutoff for incunabula. Existing side by side with handwritten manuscripts on vellum, incunabula are frequently decorated with care, treated to costly embellishment just like their parchment counterparts.

If you look at the inside of the front and back boards of the binding, this book was reinforced with bits of an “old” manuscript that wasn’t needed any longer as a text.  Sometimes texts thought to be lost turn up in bits and pieces, tucked in as waste in the bindings of later books.  Can you read this one? Our catalog has the scraps identified as “from a 14th century psalter.”

Many thanks to erikkwakkel for supplying additional information about these manuscript fragments used in the binding.  “…not 14th but late 12thc/c1200, origins Germany.”  This makes them some of our oldest fragments in UISpecColl!

Happy Miniature Monday everyone!

Today we are featuring a new acquisition—a TINY TELEVISION from Akiko Noguchi.  The TV is made of wood, and the body stands at a towering one inch tall.  Inside the body are three miniature books, each one focusing on a different aspect  of the lives of Japanese children during the 1930’s and 40’s. By altering the order of the books inside, you can alter the image on the screen. The set also comes with it’s own tiny instruction manual. A tiny TV to showcase tiny books?  Sounds good to me!

 Miniature TV set.  Japan: Akiko Noguchi, 2013. Charlotte Smith Miniature Collection; in-process

See all of our Miniature Monday posts

-Laura H.