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peabodywunderkammer:

Here’s a look at the George Peabody Library’s collection of books and ephemera relating to The Great Exhibition at the Crystal Palace in 1851. First up is a lively chromolithograph of the Crystal Palace and its grounds, showcasing boating, carriage rides, and tourists taking in the sites.

Next we have a print of “Wot is to be” : or probable results of the industry of all nations in the year ‘51 : showing what is to be exhibited, who is to exhibit it : in short, how it’s all going to be done,” a look into the inner-workings of the great exhibition. This particular print showcases inventors with their patent machines for putting down revolutions, subduing Chartism, and grinding paupers’ noses. Of course, the real star of the print is the Prize Pig, because no exhibition would be complete without impressive farm animals!

The next two images are chromolithographic prints showing the Arms of All Nations (because we all know the world is comprised of nineteen countries) and the interior of the Crystal Palace’s exhibition hall.

For a more unique view of the Great Exhibition in the Crystal Palace, check out the Lane’s Telescopic View! This ‘Telescopic View’ is made of printed paper and card, and is supplied in a slip-in card box. When you view the internal scene through the little peep hole in the cover, you see a three dimensional view of the inside of the Crystal Palace in 1851, and the grand opening by Queen Victoria. Cool, right?

uimapcoll

uimapcoll:

August 25, 1836: Bret Harte’s birthday

Guest Post from Kassie M., Grad student in the Map Collection

This map was discovered in the map collection this summer as part of the inventory project. The map features the names and illustrations of famous American writers or their characters. Bret Harte, the famous American author and poet, is featured on a map inset.

Map: Firley, H.J. (ed.) & Boys, J. (ill.) A Pictorial Map Depicting the Literacy Development of the United States. Chicago: Denoyer-Geppert:Chicago. 1952.

uwmspeccoll

uwmspeccoll:

The exhibition “Bound and Beyond: Structure in Book Art,” opens this Friday, September 19, and runs through October 10 in the UWM Union Art Gallery. Drawn primarily from the Book Arts Collection in Special Collections at the UWM Libraries, this show explores the innovative, structural ways in which artists conceive of the book as art. Max Yela, head of UWM’s Special Collections, will offer the opening gallery talk this Friday at 7 pm. Here’s a sampling of book works in the show.
Jeffrey Morin. “Sacred Space.”
Stevens Point, Wis., sailorBOYpress, 2003.
Maryann Riker. “Women’s Work 1.”
Phillipsburg, N.J.: JUSTARIP Press, 2009.
Jessica Poor. “Surrogate #5, Male.”
Milwaukee, Wis.: Fez Monkey Press, 2006.
Linda Smith. “House of Cods.”
Phoenix, Ariz.: Picnic Press, 1996.
Jody Williams. “Still Sense.”
Minneapolis, Minn.: Flying Paper Press, 2008.
Roberta Lavadour. “Relative Memory II”
Pendleton, Or.: Mission Creek Press, 2008.
Karen Hanmer. “Bluestem”
Glenview, Ill.: Karen Hanmer, 2006.
Claire Van Vliet. “Night Street.”
West Burke, Vt.: Janus Press, 1993.
Caren Heft. “Human Volcano.”
Stevens Point, Wis.: Arcadian Press, 2013.
Petra Press. “I Want a Prenup.”
Milwaukee, Wis.: Petra Press, 2005.
Daniel Kelm. “Neo Emblemata Nova.”
Easthampton, Mass: Wide Awake Garage, 2005.

Speaking of famous old people, this is a children’s book by Nathaniel Hawthorne, published in 1841, before the works that would later establish Hawthorne as one of the most famous American authors of the 19th century.  

Due to the solemn undertones contained in most of Hawthorne’s novels, some may be surprised to find that earlier in his career, he wrote books intended for a younger audience. This book, Famous Old People, was written as a companion to Grandfather’s Chair, which was published earlier in the year. Both are historical accounts of New England told by recalling the various owners of Grandfather’s well-traveled chair. 

-Kelly 

iowawomensarchives
iowawomensarchives:

"Von can’t live on luf…" postcard, 1912

Postcards provided a ubiquitous portrait of everyday culture in the 20th century, documenting buildings and streets, events and community life, business advertisements, and people and places of interest. There was also a category of comic postcards that contained cartoons and caricatures on every topic. As part of this category, there were cards illustrating [immigrant stereotypes].
Often these stereotypes were carried over… by immigrants and perpetuated by or re-created in the United States… They became a source of cultural identity.
But when is an image a straightforward rendering or a stereotype? At what point does an image shift from a faithful graphic representation to exaggerated caricature?
Caricature and stereotype represent a cultural method to deal with the unfamiliar, and for political, religious, economic, and social reasons to ‘pigeonhole’ a particular group. Caricature is a way to assert control on both sides of an issue. [source]

Iowa Digital Library: “Von can’t live on luf…” postcard, 1912
View all Women’s History Wednesday posts 

iowawomensarchives:

"Von can’t live on luf…" postcard, 1912

Postcards provided a ubiquitous portrait of everyday culture in the 20th century, documenting buildings and streets, events and community life, business advertisements, and people and places of interest. There was also a category of comic postcards that contained cartoons and caricatures on every topic. As part of this category, there were cards illustrating [immigrant stereotypes].

Often these stereotypes were carried over… by immigrants and perpetuated by or re-created in the United States… They became a source of cultural identity.

But when is an image a straightforward rendering or a stereotype? At what point does an image shift from a faithful graphic representation to exaggerated caricature?

Caricature and stereotype represent a cultural method to deal with the unfamiliar, and for political, religious, economic, and social reasons to ‘pigeonhole’ a particular group. Caricature is a way to assert control on both sides of an issue. [source]

Iowa Digital Library: “Von can’t live on luf…” postcard, 1912

View all Women’s History Wednesday posts 

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southwestcollectionarchives:

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lindahall:

Ignace Gaston Pardies - Scientist of the Day

Ignace Gaston Pardies, a French Jesuit scientist, was born Sep. 5, 1636. Pardies appears most often in historical narratives as an insightful critic of Newton’s early experiments on light, and as one of the earliest proponents of a wave theory of light. His star atlas is hardly ever mentioned, which we find perplexing, for not only is it his most impressive achievement, it is also one of the most pleasing and harmonious star atlases ever published. Nothing is known about how he compiled it, or whose observations he used, or who drew the constellation figures, but the resulting set of six plates is visually very appealing. The constellation figures are attractive and graceful, and they esthetically fit in with one another on the large plates, which is not at all the case with most star atlases of this type.

The Globi coelestis, as Pardies’ atlas was called, was first published in 1674, the year after Pardies’ early death, and it was reprinted around 1690, with the addition of the paths of several recent comets, including that of the comet of 1682, or Halley’s comet. Each edition of the Globi coelestis is quite scarce, and we are fortunate in the Linda Hall Library to have fine copies of each. We displayed both the 1674 edition and the 1690 edition in our 2007 exhibition, Out of This World.

The first two images above are from the 1674 edition, and the third is from the 1690 editon. In the last image, the line that begins above Virgo and shoots off over Leo’s back marks the path of the first appearance of Halley’s comet.

Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City

We came across a hand-colored star map in one of the collections here just last week!  We’ll make some scans and share them soon.

Lovely!

We love maps, but we don’t get to see many things like this star atlas here.

It’s Miniature Monday, folks!

Today we have eight volumes from Miniature Dictionary Publisher’s, Inc., published circa 1925.  The firm was operated by the Minkus brothers in New York City, and frequently published miniature volumes of well-known works and dictionaries.  These books were often used to advertise businesses like banks, hotels and department stores; the business in question would have its named stamped on the back of each volume it sold.  None of these copies are stamped; but the leather wallet binding and gilt-stamped titles as well as the pink-edged text blocks are characteristic of MDP Inc.  Another charming thing about these books are their bookplates—I have never seen a miniature bookplate before!  These books have a wonderful feel to them—their chunky shape and soft leather bindings make them seem almost edible!  Stop by and see them before I eat them today!

Various Authors. The Little Webster, Love and Other Stories (2 ediitons), The Arabian Nights Entertainments, The Golden Treasury of English Songs, Don Quixote, Paradise Lost, Hamlet and Macbeth.  New York: Miniature Dictionary Publisher’s, Inc. 1925.  Charlotte Smith Miniatures Collection, Uncatalogued.  Gift of Carol Kapell in memory of Paula B. Deems

Information on the volumes gathered from: Edison, Julian I.. Miniature Book News #90: 1996 September.  St. Louis, Missouri.  UNT Digital Library.

See all of our Miniature Monday posts here

-Laura H. 

Our entire video series visiting Bauman Rare Books to chat with Rebecca Romney, is finally on YouTube.  Salvador Dalí’s illustrations for Alice in Wonderland, a Shakespeare quarto, a first edition of Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, and a Latter Day Saints guide for traveling west in 1848 all make an appearance.

Enjoy!

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iowawomensarchives:

Farm girls, Newhall, Iowa, 1920s

Our farm was a mile from the school. This was my first experience of walking to school. When the weather was bad, Dad would harness the horse and take us in a buggy. In the [1910s], we didn’t have slacks — we wore long underwear, black tights, long black stockings, and four-buckle overshoes. The older children would carry drinking water from the Armstrong farm, a short distance away…
We learned to play jacks. Having cement sidewalk was almost a requirement for the game. We would play by the hour. I can recall playing until my fingernails were gone, due to scraping the cement to gather the jacks. [Cousin] Luella often joined us…
Luella and I enjoyed the [farm] cats and kittens, dressing them in doll clothes. The cats didn’t seem to mind, for they would go to sleep. — Melba Gardemann Olson unpublished memoir, 1993

Iowa Digital Library: Rural Women Digital Collection
View all Women’s History Wednesday posts

iowawomensarchives:

Farm girls, Newhall, Iowa, 1920s

Our farm was a mile from the school. This was my first experience of walking to school. When the weather was bad, Dad would harness the horse and take us in a buggy. In the [1910s], we didn’t have slacks — we wore long underwear, black tights, long black stockings, and four-buckle overshoes. The older children would carry drinking water from the Armstrong farm, a short distance away…

We learned to play jacks. Having cement sidewalk was almost a requirement for the game. We would play by the hour. I can recall playing until my fingernails were gone, due to scraping the cement to gather the jacks. [Cousin] Luella often joined us…

Luella and I enjoyed the [farm] cats and kittens, dressing them in doll clothes. The cats didn’t seem to mind, for they would go to sleep. — Melba Gardemann Olson unpublished memoir, 1993

Iowa Digital Library: Rural Women Digital Collection

View all Women’s History Wednesday posts