Last semester Jessica Rogers, a dual degree student in the School of Library and Information Science and the Center for the Book, had been working on an internship focused on Special Collections materials and Adobe Photoshop. She enhanced illegible handwritten text, repaired digital versions of damaged photographs, tested methods to scan glass plate negatives and repair the digital images, and finally she had been experimenting with colorizing historic photographs.  
To finish her project, here is a mini tutorial she made so you can try to retrace her steps to color this image of Nile Kinnick from the Iowa Digital Library.
Thanks for your hard work, Jessica!

Since coloring black and white photos is the new black (and white - Dad joke) perhaps a step-by-step ‘how to’ of handsome Nile would be a fun way to pass some time on a snowy day. It’s like a coloring book for grown-ups. 
You can download your favorite Kinnick photo from the Iowa Digital Library: http://digital.lib.uiowa.edu/kinnick/. Here’s the one I used. Of course you can browse the full digital collection for any other images you may be inclined to colorize, but the key is to keep it simple. Minimal background is helpful. 
Load the image in Photoshop. The two approaches applied to this particular image were Curve manipulation and over-painting.
The first thing to do is to convert the photo to CMYK under ‘Image-Mode’.
The sweater, face, letter jacket, pants, photographer’s backdrop, and tie were all colored with Curves:
1.Using the ‘quick selection tool’ select the desired area to be colored. You can use the alt key to subtract unwanted selections, like deselecting the eyes and lips when coloring the face. 
2. Go to ‘create new fill or adjustment layer’ at the bottom right menu and select Curves
3. Manipulate each color range until you are satisfied with the color!
 
Kinnick’s lips, eyes, hair, and blush (on cheeks, ears, tip of nose, and chin) were all colored with over painting. 
1. Add a new layer and label it whatever you are planning on coloring. 
2. You can either use the ‘quick select tool’ (on the original layer) to make sure you stay within the lines, or you can just practice a steady hand.
3. Select a brush and color and paint over the desired area. This will look incredibly garish at first but you’ll change that in the next step. 
4. In the right side menu change the drop down menu reading ‘Normal’ to ‘Soft Light’ or ‘Overlay’. This should do a lot to soften up hard colors, but if it’s not enough you can also lower the ‘Opacity’, located to the right of the ‘Normal’ menu. 
Note: When working with eyes and hair, in general features that can have different color shades, the over-painting method is nice since you can add highlights to hair or streaks of green to eyes. 
 
Hope this mini-tutorial was helpful and have fun coloring all the black and white photos that are out there!

 

Last semester Jessica Rogers, a dual degree student in the School of Library and Information Science and the Center for the Book, had been working on an internship focused on Special Collections materials and Adobe Photoshop. She enhanced illegible handwritten text, repaired digital versions of damaged photographs, tested methods to scan glass plate negatives and repair the digital images, and finally she had been experimenting with colorizing historic photographs.  

To finish her project, here is a mini tutorial she made so you can try to retrace her steps to color this image of Nile Kinnick from the Iowa Digital Library.

Thanks for your hard work, Jessica!

Since coloring black and white photos is the new black (and white - Dad joke) perhaps a step-by-step ‘how to’ of handsome Nile would be a fun way to pass some time on a snowy day. It’s like a coloring book for grown-ups.

You can download your favorite Kinnick photo from the Iowa Digital Library: http://digital.lib.uiowa.edu/kinnick/. Here’s the one I used. Of course you can browse the full digital collection for any other images you may be inclined to colorize, but the key is to keep it simple. Minimal background is helpful.

Load the image in Photoshop. The two approaches applied to this particular image were Curve manipulation and over-painting.

The first thing to do is to convert the photo to CMYK under ‘Image-Mode’.

The sweater, face, letter jacket, pants, photographer’s backdrop, and tie were all colored with Curves:

1.Using the ‘quick selection tool’ select the desired area to be colored. You can use the alt key to subtract unwanted selections, like deselecting the eyes and lips when coloring the face.

2. Go to ‘create new fill or adjustment layer’ at the bottom right menu and select Curves

3. Manipulate each color range until you are satisfied with the color!

 

Kinnick’s lips, eyes, hair, and blush (on cheeks, ears, tip of nose, and chin) were all colored with over painting.

1. Add a new layer and label it whatever you are planning on coloring.

2. You can either use the ‘quick select tool’ (on the original layer) to make sure you stay within the lines, or you can just practice a steady hand.

3. Select a brush and color and paint over the desired area. This will look incredibly garish at first but you’ll change that in the next step.

4. In the right side menu change the drop down menu reading ‘Normal’ to ‘Soft Light’ or ‘Overlay’. This should do a lot to soften up hard colors, but if it’s not enough you can also lower the ‘Opacity’, located to the right of the ‘Normal’ menu.

Note: When working with eyes and hair, in general features that can have different color shades, the over-painting method is nice since you can add highlights to hair or streaks of green to eyes.

 

Hope this mini-tutorial was helpful and have fun coloring all the black and white photos that are out there!

 

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    Niles Kinnick: even more of a babe in color.
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    Rad tutorial
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